Fruit & Nut Research & Information Center
Fruit & Nut Research & Information Center
Fruit & Nut Research & Information Center
University of California
Fruit & Nut Research & Information Center

Fig Insect, Mite & Nematode Pests

Fig in California > Deficiencies & Pests > Insect, Mite & Nematode Pests

Nematodes, specifically root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita and Meloidogyne javanica) and the dagger nematode (Xiphinema index), can reduce tree growth and yield in California. In addition to nematodes or minor insect pests and diseases can affect production of fig, although their abundance varies among regions and seasons, including:

  • Carpenter worm (Prionoxystus robiniae)
  • Darkling ground beetle (Blapstinus fuliginosus)
  • Dried fruit beetle (Carpophilus hemipterus)
  • Freeman sap beetle (Carpophilus freemani)
  • Confused sap beetle (Carpophilus mutilatus)
  • Fig beetle (Cotinis texana)
  • Fig mite (Aceria fici)
  • Fig scale (Lepiosaphes conchiformis)
  • Navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella)

For detailed information: UC Statewide IPM Program: How to Manage Pests: Fig

Photo Gallery

These photos of some of the major pests are viewed courtesy of University of California research and extension personnel and programs, including the UC Statewide IPM Program. Photo information, including the photographer, is displayed when the larger image is viewed.

 Insects, Mite & Nematode Pests | Diseases & Disorders | Vertebrates


Dried Fruit Beetle. photo by JK Clark, UC IPM Project © UC Regents
Dried Fruit Beetle. photo by JK Clark, UC IPM Project © UC Regents
Dried Fruit Beetle Larva. photo by RL Coviello © UC Regents
Dried Fruit Beetle Larva. photo by RL Coviello © UC Regents
Dried Fruit Beetle larvae. photo by RL Coviello © UC Regents
Dried Fruit Beetle larvae. photo by RL Coviello © UC Regents
Vinegar fly or small fruit fly, Drosophila sp.photo by JK Clark, UC IPM Project © UC Regents
Vinegar fly or small fruit fly, Drosophila sp.photo by JK Clark, UC IPM Project © UC Regents
Navel orangeworm larvae, distinguished by crescent shape. photo by JK Clark. UC IPM Project © UC Regent
Navel orangeworm larvae, distinguished by crescent shape. photo by JK Clark. UC IPM Project © UC Regent

Page Last Updated: July 31, 2013
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