Fruit & Nut Research & Information Center
Fruit & Nut Research & Information Center
Fruit & Nut Research & Information Center
University of California
Fruit & Nut Research & Information Center

Apricot Insect, Mite & Nematode Pests

Apricot in California > Deficiencies & Pests > Insect, Mite & Nematodes

Some rootstocks commonly used in apricot orchards are susceptible to nematode species, including root lesion (Pratylenchus vulnus), dagger (Xiphinema americanum), and ring (Mesocriconema xenoplax) and root knot (Meloidogyne) nematodes. The impact of nematodes on apricot production can be moderated by pre-plant soil fumigation or by utilizing nematode resistant rootstocks.

Peach twig borer is a common pest in commercial apricot orchards throughout California, and generally requires annual treatment. The prevalence of other major insect pests, including fruit tree leafroller (Archips argyrospila), stink bug, orange tortrix (Argyrotaenia citrana), European fruit lecanium (Parthenolecanium corni), katydids, mites, and aphids, varies among regions and years (Norton and Coates 2012, UC IPM 2012).

For detailed information: UC Statwide IPM Program: How to Manage Pests: Apricot

Apricot Photo Gallery

These photos are accessed from the UC ANR Repository, are available courtesy of University of California research and extension personnel and programs, including the UC Statewide IPM Program. Photo information, including the photographer, is displayed when the larger image is viewed.

Deficiencies | Insects & Mite Pests | Diseases & Disorders | Vertebrates

Fruittree Leafroller Larva. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Fruittree Leafroller Larva. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Leafroller Damage. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Leafroller Damage. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Adult redshouldered stink bug. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Adult redshouldered stink bug. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Forktailed Katydid and Fruit Damage. © UC Regents
Forktailed Katydid and Fruit Damage. © UC Regents
Adult European red mite. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Adult European red mite. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
An aphid nymph on an opening apricot bud. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
An aphid nymph on an opening apricot bud. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Brown Mite adults and masses of red eggs on wood. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Brown Mite adults and masses of red eggs on wood. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Peachtree Borer Larvae. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Peachtree Borer Larvae. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
San Jose Scale. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
San Jose Scale. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
European Fruit Lecanium. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
European Fruit Lecanium. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Mature Peach Twig Borer Larva. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Mature Peach Twig Borer Larva. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC Regents
Fruittree Leafroller. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC RegentsRegents
Fruittree Leafroller. photo by JKClark. UC IPM Project ©UC RegentsRegents

Page Last Updated: July 31, 2013
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