Fruit & Nut Research and Information Center
Fruit & Nut Research and Information Center
Fruit & Nut Research and Information Center
University of California
Fruit & Nut Research and Information Center

Cherry Insect & Mite Pests

Cherry > Deficiencies & PestsInsect & Mite Pests

The major pests affecting California cherry production are spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii), cherry leafhopper (Fieberiella florii), mountain leafhopper (Colladonus montanus), webspinning spider mites (Tetranychus pacificus, Tetranychus urticae), and pocket gophers (Thomomys spp.).

Deficiencies & Toxicities | Insect & Mite Pests | Diseases & Disorders | Vertebrates

Spotted wing drosophila (D. suzukii) are invasive pests that penetrate the cherry skin and lay eggs during ripening. Drosophila attack both healthy and damaged fruit (UC IPM 2013), but prefer red to dark red colored fruit. By using traps and harvesting pollinizer tree fruit that ripen prior to the desired cultivar a grower can detect the presence of SWD, monitor fly levels, and indicate the need for insecticide application. However, insecticides are the only currently-effective control treatment (Van Steenwyk 2013).

Cherry leafhopper and mountain leafhopper are problematic because they are vectors of X-Disease/cherry buckskin. If present and not controlled, these leafhoppers can spread X-Disease rapidly within and between orchards. (UC IPM 2013).

Webspinning spider mites damage leaves. Large populations, if not controlled, with miticides or natural enemies, reduce tree vigor and productivity. (UC IPM 2013).

 

Cherry Photo Gallery

These photos are accessed from the UC ANR Repository, are available courtesy of University of California research and extension personnel and programs, including the UC Statewide IPM Project. Photo information, including the photographer, is displayed when the larger image is viewed.

Drosophila suzukii larva in cherry. Photo: UC  IPM Project © UC Regents
Drosophila suzukii larva in cherry. Photo: UC IPM Project © UC Regents
Adult female Drosophila suzukii. Photo by M Hauser, California Dept. of Food & Agriculture
Adult female Drosophila suzukii. Photo by M Hauser, California Dept. of Food & Agriculture
Adult male Drosophila suzukii. Photo by M Hauser, California Dept. of Food & Agriculture
Adult male Drosophila suzukii. Photo by M Hauser, California Dept. of Food & Agriculture
Flor's (or cherry) leafhopper nymph & adult. Photo by JK Clark, UC  IPM Project © UC Regents
Flor's (or cherry) leafhopper nymph & adult. Photo by JK Clark, UC IPM Project © UC Regents
Mountain Leafhopper adult & nymph. Photo by JK Clark, UC  IPM Project © UC Regents
Mountain Leafhopper adult & nymph. Photo by JK Clark, UC IPM Project © UC Regents
Spider mite adults & egg. Photo by JK Clark, UC  IPM Project © UC Regents
Spider mite adults & egg. Photo by JK Clark, UC IPM Project © UC Regents
Cherry  (or pear) slug  & feeding damage; no dark slimy coating on mature larvae. Photo by JK Clark, UC  IPM  © UC Regents
Cherry (or pear) slug & feeding damage; no dark slimy coating on mature larvae. Photo by JK Clark, UC IPM © UC Regents

Page Last Updated: August 7, 2013
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